Posted by: thisiskv | August 7, 2012

How to make it in Namibia [Part 1].

 

I remember when I first found out Superman wasn’t real, that Superman didn’t exist; I broke down crying because my heart knew that there was no one coming to rescue us. No matter what, no matter where, Superman always came to the rescue.

I remember a story about a man who worked day and night so that his daughter could finish her degree in sociology. She managed to finish university, and after knocking on many doors she finally found a job working as a secretary in a cement company. Even so, her father always said with pride: “My daughter has a university degree.

I hate this world. I hate the government. I hate school because the teachers expected me to sit still and to pretend to be interested. But Education is the key to make it out of this hole.

I was born in one of the poorest regions in Namibia. My parents moved to Rundu with the intention of creating a better life for my family. My work ethic was instilled in my sister and me at an early age. I can remember my dad waking me up on Saturdays at 6am and we would have to work in the garden. I hated it! I would always wonder which episode of Power Rangers I was missing. My dad would always talk about how important it is to work hard for what you want and that I should stop being lazy. Now that I’m older, I’m convinced that having a winning work ethic is the key to great accomplishments.

I’m thankful for being born just when Independence was coming because Apartheid was a system built on separating people and installing deep levels of fear. I’m thankful that my parents took the opportunity of Independence to send me to all the “white schools” they could afford because they opened doors for me.

I’m sorry if I ever let you down. I’m sorry if I lost focus in my first two years at university. I’m sorry if I can’t help you right now.

But I want to make a difference and I want to give you something. This something is “Hope”. “Never give up”. This is very important in life. In everything that you do. It is the single best advice I have ever received. No matter how bad things are now, things will always get better. So far as we know, you only live once, and there’s almost nothing more worth fighting for than to figure out your personal calling—not what you’ve been told you are by your parents or teachers, but what you’re called to be—and then pursuing it even if it takes you to the ends of the earth and to the end of your own life. As Steven Pressfield  says Our job in this lifetime is not to shape ourselves into some ideal we imagine we ought to be, but to find out who we already are and become it. If we were born to paint, it’s our job to become a painter. If we were born to overthrow the order of ignorance and injustice of the world, it’s our job to realize it and get down to business.”

Finally, there’s a saying that right before you die, your whole life flashes before you and right then you realize what your calling in this life was. When I run out of time, I want to have done what I was supposed to do. It will be very hard. We will make a million mistakes, have a million things we will regret and we will pay for them all, one way or another. But regrets don’t come from following our hearts into or out of intimacy, no matter the pain involved, but because of fear, we don’t enter or leave when we should. Regrets have come when fear kept me from my heart. Deep down, your heart already knows what you want, what you are supposed to be. But maybe we have stopped listening to our hearts. The voice is lost among a cloud of fear. But try and listen, it is still alive. It is still beating. Listen, get up and start running towards your dreams.

Live from the heart

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Responses

  1. Reblogged this on Welwitschia – Education Initiative for Namibia and commented:
    We found this very inspirational text on a blog hosted by a Namibian

    • Vielen Dank! Thank you..


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